Photography Tips with Nokia 9 PureView – Understanding Pro mode

The Nokia 9 PureView is here and what better time to get into the nitty-gritty of photography.

Photography Tips with Nokia 9 PureView – Understanding Pro mode

dipankar paul dipankar paul
Staff member  /  edited August 2019
The Nokia 9 PureView is here and what better time to get into the nitty-gritty of photography. There are just so many ways you can discover the photographer in you that it's difficult to decide where to begin! 
In the coming days, I'll take you through the many concepts of photography, from composition and light to editing your photos. 
First, however, let's kick things off with the very basic settings and how you can use them. 
If you're just learning about the Pro mode on Nokia phones, the many customisable settings may be slightly overwhelming. You may also feel you would rather just point and shoot in 'auto' mode for faster results. However, if you truly want to get the best out of your Nokia 9 PureView, Pro mode is your best bet. 


PSA time: The Pro mode on the Nokia 9 PureView brings with it a bunch of improvements – with a maximum exposure time of 10 seconds, opposed to 4 seconds on legacy devices. Plus, exposure value can now be set every 1/3rd stop, as opposed to 1 stop in previous devices.
ISO
Before there were digital cameras, we all shot photos on film, and ISO was a measure of the film's sensitivity to light. One roll of film would be rated with one ISO number (ISO 100, 200, and so on), which meant the photographer would have to shoot the entire roll with a fixed ISO. In the digital world, however, things are simpler. In DSLR or smartphone cameras, the ISO setting is used to adjust the image sensor’s sensitivity to light. 
On the Nokia 9 PureView, the ISO setting ranges from 100 (least sensitive to light) to 6400 (most sensitive to light). To put it simply, the brighter the environment, the lower you must go on the ISO settings. And in darker scenarios, bump up the ISO setting to as high as you can. Beware: The higher you go on the ISO scale, the greater your chances of introducing grains in your photos and losing detail.


This collage above shows the same object photographed at ISO 100 (left) and ISO 6400 (right) in indoor lighting conditions. You can notice the detail on the bottle in the left picture, and near-complete loss of detail and the overwhelming amount of noise in the right. 
The key takeaway here is that lower ISO settings result in sharper, cleaner images. 
Shutter Speed
The second setting that is critical to controlling the outcome of a photograph is shutter speed. It is the amount of time you allow your camera shutter to stay open to let in light. The longer a shutter is open, the more the amount of light that reaches the sensor, and the brighter your picture will be, and vice versa. So, to photograph a fast-moving object, use short shutter speeds, and to capture those beautiful light trails, or silky waterfalls, use a longer shutter speed. 
Like ISO, shutter speed, too, is tricky - short shutter speeds (anything shorter than 1/500th of a second) tends to lead to darker photos, whereas longer shutter speeds (anything longer than 1/60th of a second) will lead to blurred photos if the camera isn't mounted on a tripod or at least kept on a stable surface.  


In this example, you can see the difference shutter speed makes in capturing objects in motion. On top is a photo shot at 1/30th of a second; at the bottom is one shot at 1/250. You can clearly see the difference between the blurred scooter and the sharper car. 
Playing around with the shutter speed setting is a rewarding experience. I urge you, Fans, to try it out and find your comfort zone.
White Balance
Ever notice the photos you take indoors tend to look orange-yellow? That's because you haven't adjusted the white balance setting. 
Often misunderstood and thus overlooked, white balance is the most powerful tool most smartphone photographers rarely use. This setting removes unreal colours from a photograph - essentially ensuring that objects that appear white in person are rendered white on a photograph. 
To explain further - light has a temperature. An overcast sky is "cool" so photos appear bluish, while a halogen lamp is "warm" resulting in yellowish-orange photos. The role of white balancing is to ensure white objects (and by extension all other colours) are captured correctly.


This photo shows how the same scene looks under the white balance settings on the Nokia 9 PureView – (from left to right) incandescent, fluorescent, shade, cloudy, daylight, automatic. 
Now, none of what I've mentioned above are absolute rules. You can play with shutter speed to get lovely light trails. Or you could bump up your ISO settings to get gritty, moody portraits. Indeed, you can even go wild with your white balance. Want a blue sunset, tweak your settings! 
However, the underlying point is this: know how everything works first before you go experimenting!
We hope this article has removed some of the apprehensions you may have had about using the Pro or manual mode on your Nokia smartphone camera. 
Now, get clicking and share your photos!
If you have any questions or observations, please tell me in the comments below.

Comments

  • Stukloplast Stukloplast
    ✭✭  / 
    And no manual focus :smiley: Real "pro" phone...
  • user1528226019961 user1528226019961
    ✭✭✭  / 
    Dear Dipankar Paul,

    Thank you very much for your first of a series of articles presenting and explaining how Nokia 9 users can maximize the use of PRO mode.

    Such initiative is truly relevant, and it will be even more important if, as you say, our comments and suggestions are gathered by you, namely to produce solutions, and ALSO to provide Nokia software development staff our feedback as end users.

    In other words, I personally see your role here also as a guarantee that our opinions and requests are delivered to and listened by the right HMD staff.

    In short, I find your first article very useful, I find Tomasz ExFiddling comments on camera software bugs/omissions pretty objective and mandatory, and I again repeat my request to introduce a manual focus slider in Pro mode.

    Finally, my personal view about upgrading and keeping confidence in a given brand irrespective of its unquestionable quality. One of the factors that does prevent me to invest in an overall better and new equipment is the sensation that basic / crucial features that can be made available (now) to current (and really good) hardware, are postponed or skipped by marketing goals. The opposite behavior will drive me to invest in new, and for sure better equipment, that I foresee that will always be kept on its intrinsic top potential.

    Thanks, looking forward to read your future posts. 
  • user1528226019961 user1528226019961
    ✭✭✭  / 
    And also Stukloplast's comment, that I've just seen.

    Thanks 
  • user1528226019961 user1528226019961
    ✭✭✭  / 
    Once again Tomasz ExFiddling was perfectly clear and correct on his last message.

    Thanks!
  • As the tradition shows, I would rather not count on the answer :-)
  • Stukloplast Stukloplast
    ✭✭  / 
    Just made some tests with the so called pro mode, which  should be a plain manual mode, and on this phone is nothing like that. 
    I'm perfectly aware how to shoot in manual mode, as I have won some awards as an amateur photographer at some places shooting in manual mode with manual lenses and a mirrorless camera. 
    Honestly, I couldn't figure out how this trash works and what is it's logic. Not to say that after the latest fw it doesn't show the actual look while changing settings for ss and iso, which was working before. The lack of manual focus is not to comment. Pro mode here should be called "kinda lucky mode". And we wait for the "second generation", like the new hardware will solve the brain issues. We are not iPhone users! Good luck Nokia...
  • madbilly madbilly
    Super User  /  edited August 2019
    Thanks for sharing this intro to using Pro mode. You've had some great comments in this thread and others from people who use this phone and the Pro mode, it would be nice to see some actual improvement to the camera app - it must be at least as capable as the old Pro mode on Lumia devices, and according to many people it is missing many features which those Lumias had. Please, HMD, just try a little bit harder - you'll go from Good to Excellent, maybe even to Superb ;)
    To everyone else, if you find something which you think is not working correctly or could be improved then my suggestion is to send an email to support, detailing the Expected behaviour, the Actual behaviour, the Gap between the two and the Consequences that this has on your experience, plus the specific Action you recommend to fix it. This forum is mainly for peer-to-peer community support, the best way to get bugs fixed and improvements made is to email support.
    Still, please also post here so we can talk about the topics and get the big issues to the top of the Best Of list: https://community.phones.nokia.com/bestof/
    Cheers :)
  • singhnsk singhnsk
    Super User  / 
    Thank you @dipankar paul. It was some nice information for a photography noob like me. I do not expect myself to suddenly start taking better photos, but maybe I can try more.

    One thing I'd like to know (other users are welcome to respond if they can handle the nooby question) about ISO will be about the path to take in low-light situation. As you say, the lower light situations will demand for a higher ISO, but that will also result in a loss of quality. So, what will be my point to go higher on the ISO scale when it will end up giving me a degraded photo? Also, in the example, the lower ISO (100) performed better. So.. what situation should require me to bump the ISO to something as high as 1600. A night sky?
    Another thing is about the shutter speed. What will give me better results if I'm shooting an object in low light? A higher ISO or a longer shutter speed or a combination of both? I wish somebody could give more examples to understand how to combine the different options for a better shot. I guess I'll have to fiddle with the different combinations.

    We definitely need more of these with a specific section of the forum where new users will be able to access them easily. Otherwise, a month later, this post will be nowhere to find. I agree that the forum will need some changes to get that done.
    Also, I hope that the phones respond to these options as and how a photographer expects. Because if it is there and does not do the work as it is directed to, maybe it will not give a good photo.
  • madbilly madbilly
    Super User  / 
    Note that I don't have a 9PV my questions are about a Nokia 8.
    I'd like to know how my camera app works when I'm not taking photos in full resolution. How does it change the resolution from the sensor into the lower resolution? What algorithms are used?
    I'd also like to know how the app works when it detects two or more faces, how does it decide who to focus on?
    If I manually select a focus point by tapping my finger I am able to change the brightness of the photo. What is this doing from a technical point of view?
    There's one setting in pro mode which you didn't describe above which is exposure compensation (I think). What is that used for an how does it work?
    Thanks :)
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    singhnsk said:
    Thank you @dipankar paul. It was some nice information for a photography noob like me. I do not expect myself to suddenly start taking better photos, but maybe I can try more.

    One thing I'd like to know (other users are welcome to respond if they can handle the nooby question) about ISO will be about the path to take in low-light situation. As you say, the lower light situations will demand for a higher ISO, but that will also result in a loss of quality. So, what will be my point to go higher on the ISO scale when it will end up giving me a degraded photo? Also, in the example, the lower ISO (100) performed better. So.. what situation should require me to bump the ISO to something as high as 1600. A night sky?

    Yes, You should bump your ISO to such a high level while capturing images in extremely low light situations. This is then combined with the Shutter Speed. Higher ISO means more noise but longer shutter speed then helps in capturing more light and thus reducing the noise. But you will need a tripod.
    Another thing is about the shutter speed. What will give me better results if I'm shooting an object in low light? A higher ISO or a longer shutter speed or a combination of both? I wish somebody could give more examples to understand how to combine the different options for a better shot. I guess I'll have to fiddle with the different combinations.
    Combination of both. ISO and shutter speed go hand in hand. I mostly use IS0 of 100 and 200 and just play with the shutter speed. Again, a tripod is a must.
    We definitely need more of these with a specific section of the forum where new users will be able to access them easily. Otherwise, a month later, this post will be nowhere to find. I agree that the forum will need some changes to get that done.
    Also, I hope that the phones respond to these options as and how a photographer expects. Because if it is there and does not do the work as it is directed to, maybe it will not give a good photo.
    Yes, a photography-related section is a must and I have asked for it in the past. It will be much more useful to look for camera-related topics all in one place. :)
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    madbilly said:
    Note that I don't have a 9PV my questions are about a Nokia 8.
    I'd like to know how my camera app works when I'm not taking photos in full resolution. How does it change the resolution from the sensor into the lower resolution? What algorithms are used?
    I'd also like to know how the app works when it detects two or more faces, how does it decide who to focus on?
    If I manually select a focus point by tapping my finger I am able to change the brightness of the photo. What is this doing from a technical point of view?
    There's one setting in pro mode which you didn't describe above which is exposure compensation (I think). What is that used for an how does it work?
    Thanks :)
    When you tap to focus it adjusts the brightness in the viewfinder which is Exposure Value (EV). You can increase or decrease the brightness by sliding your finger up or down. This also changes the ISO level along with the EV resulting in darker or brighter images where dark images have lower EV and bright images have higher EV.
    You cannot use Exposure Value if you have manually set a shutter speed. As I said above it darkens or brightens the image and the same thing can be achieved by manually setting ISO and Shutter speed. :)
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    For all those who are requesting the Manual Focus. It seems Manual Focus can create problems for the Nokia 9 PureView. The reason could be processing. To be able to successfully combine all images taken from 5 cameras all sensors need to focus on the same point at the same time. And doing this manually could be resource hungry? Maybe this is the reason they didn't include the manual focus slider in the pro mode of Nokia 9 PureView.

    I agree that in dark situations manual focus helps a lot as tap to focus doesn't work. Maybe they can include the manual focus and limit some other functions of the Nokia 9 PureView while in Pro Mode if it is possible to do it.
  • user1528226019961 user1528226019961
    ✭✭✭  / 
    @Kartik Gada
    Hi, if such manual focus issues occur with Nokia 9 hardware  in very low ligh then an infinite focus lock position should be provided.
    Thanks
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    @Kartik Gada
    Hi, if such manual focus issues occur with Nokia 9 hardware  in very low ligh then an infinite focus lock position should be provided.
    Thanks
    Infinite Focus will blur nearby subjects and hence it isn't a proper solution. Mostly it is used to capture faraway subjects like the night sky, moon, etc.
  • user1528226019961 user1528226019961
    ✭✭✭  / 
    @Kartik Gada
    That's what I want it for... Night sky... For closer objects and , say, 4-10 sec exposures, just illuminate them with a flashlight and then extinguish the light immediately after exposure begins.
    For night long exposures without background illuminated subjects, infinity focus is a must.

    Thanks!
  • For all those who are requesting the Manual Focus. It seems Manual Focus can create problems for the Nokia 9 PureView. The reason could be processing. To be able to successfully combine all images taken from 5 cameras all sensors need to focus on the same point at the same time. And doing this manually could be resource hungry? Maybe this is the reason they didn't include the manual focus slider in the pro mode of Nokia 9 PureView.

    I agree that in dark situations manual focus helps a lot as tap to focus doesn't work. Maybe they can include the manual focus and limit some other functions of the Nokia 9 PureView while in Pro Mode if it is possible to do it.
    I don't think, there is a big difference betweem auto and manual focus
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    For all those who are requesting the Manual Focus. It seems Manual Focus can create problems for the Nokia 9 PureView. The reason could be processing. To be able to successfully combine all images taken from 5 cameras all sensors need to focus on the same point at the same time. And doing this manually could be resource hungry? Maybe this is the reason they didn't include the manual focus slider in the pro mode of Nokia 9 PureView.

    I agree that in dark situations manual focus helps a lot as tap to focus doesn't work. Maybe they can include the manual focus and limit some other functions of the Nokia 9 PureView while in Pro Mode if it is possible to do it.
    I don't think, there is a big difference betweem auto and manual focus
    Yeah, I might be wrong but I would love to know more details. Can you explain a bit more in detail or share your thoughts? 

    Thanks 😊
  • Tim9 Tim9
    ✭✭  / 
    @Kartik,
    I think the issue may be that the focus is not calibrated internally and hence they cannot manually adjust the focus on all the cameras to the same value. If, for example, the lens focus is temperature sensitive the calibration may be extremely difficult to do.
  • madbilly madbilly
    Super User  / 
    On the 8 if I adjust shutter speed I cannot adjust EV, and vice versa (the GUI screws up a bit on this, as I can adjust EV then adjust shutter speed and it greys out the EV slider in the position I set it to giving the impression EV is locked to what I set it to but in fact it is reset to 0).
    If I adjust ISO I have no problem adjusting EV and vice versa.
    So how does EV work then, technically? I can understand that shutter speed controls the amount time the sensors record light levels, but what does EV do?
    If there are difficulties implementing features in the 9PV then HMD should explain why. That's generally what old Nokia did - their whitepapers are full of explanations about why they chose to do things the way they did. HMD should have produced a whitepaper for the 9PV.
    Cheers :)
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    madbilly said:
    On the 8 if I adjust shutter speed I cannot adjust EV, and vice versa (the GUI screws up a bit on this, as I can adjust EV then adjust shutter speed and it greys out the EV slider in the position I set it to giving the impression EV is locked to what I set it to but in fact it is reset to 0).
    If I adjust ISO I have no problem adjusting EV and vice versa.
    So how does EV work then, technically? I can understand that shutter speed controls the amount time the sensors record light levels, but what does EV do?
    If there are difficulties implementing features in the 9PV then HMD should explain why. That's generally what old Nokia did - their whitepapers are full of explanations about why they chose to do things the way they did. HMD should have produced a whitepaper for the 9PV.
    Cheers :)
    Yes, as I said above EV won't work when you adjust the Shutter Speed. The slider greys out because you are taking Exposure in your hands by playing with the Shutter speed or the exposure time. Here, you are deciding how much time the shutter remains open to collect light. Hence, there's no use of the EV slider. This is same for every phone. :)
    ISO just determines how sensitive is the camera to light. So, increasing the ISO will just increase the sensitivity of the camera. This doesn't interfere with the Exposure time. Hence, you can still adjust the EV aka brightness. :)
    EV does the same thing as Shutter speed but at a smaller level. If you increase only the EV the camera bumps the ISO and click the image at certain shutter speed depending on the amount of light in the environment.
    Yes, I agree. There should have been a Whitepaper explaining in detail everything about the Nokia 9 PureView. But, the only missing feature in the ProMode of Nokia 9 PureView is the Manual Focus slider and it would be appreciated if Sarvikas explains why it is removed. :)
  • For all those who are requesting the Manual Focus. It seems Manual Focus can create problems for the Nokia 9 PureView. The reason could be processing. To be able to successfully combine all images taken from 5 cameras all sensors need to focus on the same point at the same time. And doing this manually could be resource hungry? Maybe this is the reason they didn't include the manual focus slider in the pro mode of Nokia 9 PureView.

    I agree that in dark situations manual focus helps a lot as tap to focus doesn't work. Maybe they can include the manual focus and limit some other functions of the Nokia 9 PureView while in Pro Mode if it is possible to do it.
    I don't think, there is a big difference betweem auto and manual focus
    Yeah, I might be wrong but I would love to know more details. Can you explain a bit more in detail or share your thoughts? 

    Thanks 😊
    In every DSLR camera lens it's just set by motor, or by hand.Question is  question, how is the measurement method in Nokia 9 is it set by one sensor and later transmissed to other or its done by deph sensor, couse I can't imagine, that every lens does it idependently.
  • madbilly said:
    On the 8 if I adjust shutter speed I cannot adjust EV, and vice versa (the GUI screws up a bit on this, as I can adjust EV then adjust shutter speed and it greys out the EV slider in the position I set it to giving the impression EV is locked to what I set it to but in fact it is reset to 0).
    If I adjust ISO I have no problem adjusting EV and vice versa.
    So how does EV work then, technically? I can understand that shutter speed controls the amount time the sensors record light levels, but what does EV do?
    If there are difficulties implementing features in the 9PV then HMD should explain why. That's generally what old Nokia did - their whitepapers are full of explanations about why they chose to do things the way they did. HMD should have produced a whitepaper for the 9PV.
    Cheers :)
    Yes, as I said above EV won't work when you adjust the Shutter Speed. The slider greys out because you are taking Exposure in your hands by playing with the Shutter speed or the exposure time. Here, you are deciding how much time the shutter remains open to collect light. Hence, there's no use of the EV slider. This is same for every phone. :)
    ISO just determines how sensitive is the camera to light. So, increasing the ISO will just increase the sensitivity of the camera. This doesn't interfere with the Exposure time. Hence, you can still adjust the EV aka brightness. :)
    EV does the same thing as Shutter speed but at a smaller level. If you increase only the EV the camera bumps the ISO and click the image at certain shutter speed depending on the amount of light in the environment.
    Yes, I agree. There should have been a Whitepaper explaining in detail everything about the Nokia 9 PureView. But, the only missing feature in the ProMode of Nokia 9 PureView is the Manual Focus slider and it would be appreciated if Sarvikas explains why it is removed. :)
    And why when You decide to set manually Iso and shutter after refocusing all this values have to set from beginning.
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    For all those who are requesting the Manual Focus. It seems Manual Focus can create problems for the Nokia 9 PureView. The reason could be processing. To be able to successfully combine all images taken from 5 cameras all sensors need to focus on the same point at the same time. And doing this manually could be resource hungry? Maybe this is the reason they didn't include the manual focus slider in the pro mode of Nokia 9 PureView.

    I agree that in dark situations manual focus helps a lot as tap to focus doesn't work. Maybe they can include the manual focus and limit some other functions of the Nokia 9 PureView while in Pro Mode if it is possible to do it.
    I don't think, there is a big difference betweem auto and manual focus
    Yeah, I might be wrong but I would love to know more details. Can you explain a bit more in detail or share your thoughts? 

    Thanks 😊
    In every DSLR camera lens it's just set by motor, or by hand.Question is  question, how is the measurement method in Nokia 9 is it set by one sensor and later transmissed to other or its done by deph sensor, couse I can't imagine, that every lens does it idependently.
    All 5 cameras and the ToF sensor are used to capture the depth. So, in bokeh mode, all cameras must be capturing images at different focus range and then combine it into a single image with up to 1200 layers of depth. So, to capture the depth each camera works independently. :)
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  /  edited August 2019
    And why when You decide to set manually Iso and shutter after refocusing all this values have to set from beginning.
    It seems this happens only on the Nokia 9 PureView. I don't own a Nokia 9 PureView so I cannot confirm but I have never faced this on my Nokia 7 Plus and if this issue is happening then needs to be fixed.
  • For all those who are requesting the Manual Focus. It seems Manual Focus can create problems for the Nokia 9 PureView. The reason could be processing. To be able to successfully combine all images taken from 5 cameras all sensors need to focus on the same point at the same time. And doing this manually could be resource hungry? Maybe this is the reason they didn't include the manual focus slider in the pro mode of Nokia 9 PureView.

    I agree that in dark situations manual focus helps a lot as tap to focus doesn't work. Maybe they can include the manual focus and limit some other functions of the Nokia 9 PureView while in Pro Mode if it is possible to do it.
    I don't think, there is a big difference betweem auto and manual focus
    Yeah, I might be wrong but I would love to know more details. Can you explain a bit more in detail or share your thoughts? 

    Thanks 😊
    In every DSLR camera lens it's just set by motor, or by hand.Question is  question, how is the measurement method in Nokia 9 is it set by one sensor and later transmissed to other or its done by deph sensor, couse I can't imagine, that every lens does it idependently.
    All 5 cameras and the ToF sensor are used to capture the depth. So, in bokeh mode, all cameras must be capturing images at different focus range and then combine it into a single image with up to 1200 layers of depth. So, to capture the depth each camera works independently. :)
    But there is always a certain focus point set by user by clicking on the screen, and this depth layers , I think, are set before and after this point, yes ?. It's logical.So I mean, why why not let it happen, to set this first point manually, as a base for all calculations ?
  • stetre76 stetre76
    ✭✭  / 
    @Kartik Gada
    I generally agree with your explanation and you are correct.
    I only disagree with one statement
    "Yes, as I said above EV won't work when you adjust the Shutter Speed. The slider greys out because you are taking Exposure in your hands by playing with the Shutter speed or the exposure time. Here, you are deciding how much time the shutter remains open to collect light. Hence, there's no use of the EV slider."

    There are a couple of situations where adjusting shutter speend AND exposure compensation make sense...I am combining this with my DSLR quite often, for example when taking photos of flowing water and getting this nice veil-effect.

    But yeah, the 9PV is still a smartphone and comparing its camera features with the possibilities of a DSLR is probably a bit far off
  • Kartik Gada Kartik Gada
    Super User  / 
    stetre76 said:
    @Kartik Gada
    I generally agree with your explanation and you are correct.
    I only disagree with one statement
    "Yes, as I said above EV won't work when you adjust the Shutter Speed. The slider greys out because you are taking Exposure in your hands by playing with the Shutter speed or the exposure time. Here, you are deciding how much time the shutter remains open to collect light. Hence, there's no use of the EV slider."

    There are a couple of situations where adjusting shutter speend AND exposure compensation make sense...I am combining this with my DSLR quite often, for example when taking photos of flowing water and getting this nice veil-effect.

    But yeah, the 9PV is still a smartphone and comparing its camera features with the possibilities of a DSLR is probably a bit far off
    Thanks for your comment. I got to know something new :)
    I have never used a DSLR so I was not sure how it works on those proper cameras. But most smartphones with Pro Mode that I have seen do not allow us to change the EV if we manually adjust the Shutter Speed. That's why I said there's no use of EV Slider and It is same for every phone. Now that II know it works in a different way on DSLR's it is a lot useful feature. :) 

    As this is possible on DSLR's I hope it will be implemented on phones as well (if it hasn't been implemented yet).  :)


  • madbilly madbilly
    Super User  / 
    About EV and shutter speed: I think the main difference between DSLR and smartphone is that DSLR has a physical shutter, not electronic, so the shutter speed does actually mean the physical shutter opening time. In this case EV can be considered fully independent.
    On a smartphone the shutter is electronic, we just tell it how to long to record light intensity for. In this case EV cannot be so independent and may be why it cannot be adjusted independently.
    In any case, I would like a whitepaper on this subject and on how focus works with the depth mapping and multiple exposures!
    Cheers :)
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